2014-03-31

[DIV28_ANNOUNCEMENT] Division 28 Newsletter

Hello,

 

Attached you should find the spring edition of the Division 28 newsletter.

 

Enjoy,

Micky Koffarnus

 

 

Mikhail Koffarnus

Research Assistant Professor

Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute

2 Riverside Circle

Roanoke, VA 24016

phone: 540.526.2107

[DIV28SUPER] FW: Call for Applications: SPSSI Policy Workshop


www.spssi.org

SPSSI logo

 

 

SPSSI Policy Workshop
June 26, 2014
Portland, OR

The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) is delighted to announce a special summer Policy Workshop.  This exceptional training opportunity will take place on June 26, 2014, directly before the SPSSI Biennial Conference in Portland, OR. The workshop content is diverse and applicable to psychologists at all career stages, but several sessions are targeted primarily at early career psychologists and graduate students.  The workshop is open to SPSSI members and others, including those who have limited direct policy experience.

The workshop will expose psychologists to the links between academia and policy work at national and international levels, and will feature specific skills training. Speakers will discuss how to bring empirical research findings to bear on public policy, and will review policy-related fellowship opportunities. Specifically, the workshop will feature presentations and interactive sessions on:

  • The connections between psychological science and the world of policy-making
  • How to work with professional organizations to conduct federal advocacy
  • Policy-related fellowship opportunities and experiences
  • How to conduct international policy work
  • How to write grant-proposals that tie in policy implications of your research

Please see more details, including application information, on the SPSSI website.

 


2014-03-27

[DIV28_ANNOUNCEMENT] Table of Contents for the April 2014 issue of ECP

Dear Colleagues,

Attached please find the Table of Contents of Experimental and Clinical
Psychopharmacology's Special Issue on "ADHD, Impulsivity, and Alcohol Abuse."

Best,
Ellen Walker

_____________________div28announce____________________________
A Division 28 announcement-only list subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org

2014-03-24

Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

John,

I think you've missed my point. Jed Rose and others whose diligence has made even the most self-involved teenager aware of the health hazards of tobacco smoking, may inadvertently make it seem, to the scientifically na├»ve, as if e-cigarettes are free of risks. They exist, however. To me, the most serious are those arising from gestational exposure to nicotine and its effects on brain development. To some young women who would not dream of smoking or drinking while pregnant, the allure of the more 'benign" e-cigarette may be hard to resist. I come from a different perspective. Who would have thought, a few years ago, that feeding infant formula in plastic bottles hardened by Bisphenol A presented a threat to brain development and planted the seeds of prostate cancer? Or that shampoos and perfumes containing phthalates could demasculinize the male fetus in pregnant women using those products?  I concede the advantages of e-cigarettes over tobacco products, but they are not free of health costs, especially subtle ones.

Bernie
_______________________
 Bernard Weiss, Ph.D.
Professor of Environmental Medicine
University of Rochester
School of Medicine and Dentistry
Rochester, NY 14642

tel:         585-275-1736
fax:        585-256-2591




From: John Grabowski <grabo040@UMN.EDU>
Reply-To: "grabo040@UMN.EDU" <grabo040@UMN.EDU>
Date: Monday, March 24, 2014 3:42 PM
To: "DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG" <DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG>
Subject: Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

A thought: Is the quibble here between the need/demand for Abstinence (and
perfection--Calvin would be pleased) and the Harm Reduction perspective, a
pill hard to swallow in the US but widely recognized in many countries as
having important benefits?

As for the comment that "no women should have access to
nicotine"--silliness for two reasons. Prohibition has never been effective
for its intended purpose. And for a woman who would otherwise continue to
smoke cigarettes, nicotine preparations do indeed provide the Harm
Reduction possibility--ooops there he goes again.

Oh, and yep, if you jump in a vat of nicotine it will likely have adverse
consequences. We agree on that do we not? Recall the disorders of those who
worked in the tobacco fields and sheds? Sad to say that, as with the
Malaysian flight event, and in this case nicotine, even the NYT has found
it necessary to pander to the "reality TV" crowd.

Be well, enjoy the dialogue.

John Grabowski PhD
Professor
Director, Ambulatory Research Center
Department of Psychiatry
Medical School
University of Minnesota






On Mar 24 2014, Robert F Smith wrote:

Feelings are CLEARLY running strong on this, and I feel everyone has some
valid points, but I have to say I resonate most with Jed. No pregnant
women, and no children/adolescents should have access to nicotine in any
form, but adult smokers very substantially reduce their health risks by
switching to e-cigarettes. Although not yet marketed/approved for smoking
reduction, anecdotal evidence suggests that they may be the best
stop-smoking aids yet developed, and switching to them clearly eliminates
all risk associated with the carbon monoxide, particulates, and carcinogens
found in tobacco smoke, as well as the second/third-hand risks of these.
I've heard a quote attributed to a WHO official that the current uproar
over e-cigarettes just diverts attention from the far greater hazards of
smoking.

Bob Smith

Robert F. Smith, PhD
Professor of Psychology
MSN 3F5
4400 University Dr.
Fairfax, VA 22030
Phone: 703 993 4339

________________________________________
From: div28super reaches div28 and div28m and its nested lists (e.g.
div28s) <DIV28SUPER@lists.apa.org> on behalf of Jed Rose
Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 1:06 PM
Subject: Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

I think it is important to distinguish between two quite distinct issues:

1) Acute toxicity of nicotine: it has long been known that nicotine in
pure form is highly toxic, and even medicinal nicotine products are not
without risk if they fall into the hands of children. It is therefore
imperative that the FDA regulate all forms of nicotine to ensure that
packaging is acceptably safe;

2) The chronic health risks of moderate doses of nicotine, which are far
less than those of cigarettes, according to most experts. These experts
include Mitch Zeller, Director of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (he
stated the conclusion about nicotine at a recent FDLI conference).
Theoretical speculations about nicotinic/muscarinic balance must be viewed
in the context of hard evidence, which thus far suggests that nicotine is
indeed much less harmful than smoking. See also the findings of the Lung
Health Study and other epidemiologic studies of the effects of nicotine
when derived from non-combusted tobacco.

Dr. Neal Benowitz, quoted in the New York Time news article, has written:

"The development of a consumer-acceptable inhaled nicotine delivery system
with absorption kinetics similar to those of a cigarette would be an
important advancement in pursuing harm reduction through nicotine
maintenance."
(Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics 83(4):531-41, 2008)

The recent Surgeon General's report estimated 480,000 premature deaths
from smoking, largely due to the non-nicotine components of smoke produced
by burning tobacco. E-cigarettes represent a promising approach to reducing
this enormous death toll, and while FDA regulation is necessary to minimize
the risk to children, to label the e-liquid "poison" is a bit of hyperbole
that does not contribute to a sensible discussion of the topic.

Sincerely,

Jed E. Rose, Ph.D.
Director, Center for Smoking Cessation
and Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Duke
University Medical Center
2424 Erwin Road, Suite 201
Durham, NC 27705
919-668-5055 (phone)
919-668-5088 (FAX)

Dukesmoking.com


-----Original Message-----
From: div28super reaches div28 and div28m and its nested lists (e.g.
div28s) [mailto:DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG] On Behalf Of Herbert Barry III
PhD
Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 10:38 AM
Subject: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

When I initially heard about e-cigarettes, I doubted that they were safe
alternatives to tobacco because of omitting components of tobacco that
cause lung cancer and other maladies. Nicotine is a powerful endogenous
substance, and overloding the system with exogenous nicotine might have
adverse side effects, such as disrupting the balance between nicotinic and
muscarinic stimulation.

The new information about toxic and even lethal effects of liquid nicotine
indicates a very severe peril. I am reminded now about reports, many years
ago, that swallowing a few cigarettes might be lethal because of overdose
of nicotine. The effect is greatly diluted when nicotine is in a smoked
cigarette.

An analogy is the dangerous and even lethal effects of overdose and
chronic ue of morphine, heroin, ad other opiates. An important advance of
our knowedge a few decades ago was the discovery of endorphins, which are
endogenous sources of analgesia, miimicke by opiates.
--- Herb Barry

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________


--
John Grabowski PhD
Professor
Director, Ambulatory Research Center
Department of Psychiatry
Medical School
University of Minnesota

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________

Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

A thought: Is the quibble here between the need/demand for Abstinence (and
perfection--Calvin would be pleased) and the Harm Reduction perspective, a
pill hard to swallow in the US but widely recognized in many countries as
having important benefits?

As for the comment that "no women should have access to
nicotine"--silliness for two reasons. Prohibition has never been effective
for its intended purpose. And for a woman who would otherwise continue to
smoke cigarettes, nicotine preparations do indeed provide the Harm
Reduction possibility--ooops there he goes again.

Oh, and yep, if you jump in a vat of nicotine it will likely have adverse
consequences. We agree on that do we not? Recall the disorders of those who
worked in the tobacco fields and sheds? Sad to say that, as with the
Malaysian flight event, and in this case nicotine, even the NYT has found
it necessary to pander to the "reality TV" crowd.

Be well, enjoy the dialogue.

John Grabowski PhD
Professor
Director, Ambulatory Research Center
Department of Psychiatry
Medical School
University of Minnesota






On Mar 24 2014, Robert F Smith wrote:

Feelings are CLEARLY running strong on this, and I feel everyone has some
valid points, but I have to say I resonate most with Jed. No pregnant
women, and no children/adolescents should have access to nicotine in any
form, but adult smokers very substantially reduce their health risks by
switching to e-cigarettes. Although not yet marketed/approved for smoking
reduction, anecdotal evidence suggests that they may be the best
stop-smoking aids yet developed, and switching to them clearly eliminates
all risk associated with the carbon monoxide, particulates, and carcinogens
found in tobacco smoke, as well as the second/third-hand risks of these.
I've heard a quote attributed to a WHO official that the current uproar
over e-cigarettes just diverts attention from the far greater hazards of
smoking.
>
>Bob Smith
>
>Robert F. Smith, PhD
>Professor of Psychology
>MSN 3F5
>4400 University Dr.
>Fairfax, VA 22030
>Phone: 703 993 4339
>Email: bsmith@gmu.edu
>
>________________________________________
From: div28super reaches div28 and div28m and its nested lists (e.g.
div28s) <DIV28SUPER@lists.apa.org> on behalf of Jed Rose
<jed.rose@DUKE.EDU>
>Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 1:06 PM
>To: DIV28SUPER@lists.apa.org
>Subject: Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes
>
>I think it is important to distinguish between two quite distinct issues:
>
1) Acute toxicity of nicotine: it has long been known that nicotine in
pure form is highly toxic, and even medicinal nicotine products are not
without risk if they fall into the hands of children. It is therefore
imperative that the FDA regulate all forms of nicotine to ensure that
packaging is acceptably safe;
>
2) The chronic health risks of moderate doses of nicotine, which are far
less than those of cigarettes, according to most experts. These experts
include Mitch Zeller, Director of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (he
stated the conclusion about nicotine at a recent FDLI conference).
Theoretical speculations about nicotinic/muscarinic balance must be viewed
in the context of hard evidence, which thus far suggests that nicotine is
indeed much less harmful than smoking. See also the findings of the Lung
Health Study and other epidemiologic studies of the effects of nicotine
when derived from non-combusted tobacco.
>
>Dr. Neal Benowitz, quoted in the New York Time news article, has written:
>
"The development of a consumer-acceptable inhaled nicotine delivery system
with absorption kinetics similar to those of a cigarette would be an
important advancement in pursuing harm reduction through nicotine
maintenance."
>(Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics 83(4):531-41, 2008)
>
The recent Surgeon General's report estimated 480,000 premature deaths
from smoking, largely due to the non-nicotine components of smoke produced
by burning tobacco. E-cigarettes represent a promising approach to reducing
this enormous death toll, and while FDA regulation is necessary to minimize
the risk to children, to label the e-liquid "poison" is a bit of hyperbole
that does not contribute to a sensible discussion of the topic.
>
>Sincerely,
>
>Jed E. Rose, Ph.D.
>Director, Center for Smoking Cessation
and Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Duke
University Medical Center
>2424 Erwin Road, Suite 201
>Durham, NC 27705
>919-668-5055 (phone)
>919-668-5088 (FAX)
>
>Dukesmoking.com
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
From: div28super reaches div28 and div28m and its nested lists (e.g.
div28s) [mailto:DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG] On Behalf Of Herbert Barry III
PhD
>Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 10:38 AM
>To: DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG
>Subject: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes
>
When I initially heard about e-cigarettes, I doubted that they were safe
alternatives to tobacco because of omitting components of tobacco that
cause lung cancer and other maladies. Nicotine is a powerful endogenous
substance, and overloding the system with exogenous nicotine might have
adverse side effects, such as disrupting the balance between nicotinic and
muscarinic stimulation.
>
The new information about toxic and even lethal effects of liquid nicotine
indicates a very severe peril. I am reminded now about reports, many years
ago, that swallowing a few cigarettes might be lethal because of overdose
of nicotine. The effect is greatly diluted when nicotine is in a smoked
cigarette.
>
An analogy is the dangerous and even lethal effects of overdose and
chronic ue of morphine, heroin, ad other opiates. An important advance of
our knowedge a few decades ago was the discovery of endorphins, which are
endogenous sources of analgesia, miimicke by opiates.
>--- Herb Barry
>
>___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org
>
>___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org
>
>___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org
>

--
John Grabowski PhD
Professor
Director, Ambulatory Research Center
Department of Psychiatry
Medical School
University of Minnesota

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org

Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

Feelings are CLEARLY running strong on this, and I feel everyone has some valid points, but I have to say I resonate most with Jed. No pregnant women, and no children/adolescents should have access to nicotine in any form, but adult smokers very substantially reduce their health risks by switching to e-cigarettes. Although not yet marketed/approved for smoking reduction, anecdotal evidence suggests that they may be the best stop-smoking aids yet developed, and switching to them clearly eliminates all risk associated with the carbon monoxide, particulates, and carcinogens found in tobacco smoke, as well as the second/third-hand risks of these. I've heard a quote attributed to a WHO official that the current uproar over e-cigarettes just diverts attention from the far greater hazards of smoking.

Bob Smith

Robert F. Smith, PhD
Professor of Psychology
MSN 3F5
4400 University Dr.
Fairfax, VA 22030
Phone: 703 993 4339
Email: bsmith@gmu.edu

________________________________________
From: div28super reaches div28 and div28m and its nested lists (e.g. div28s) <DIV28SUPER@lists.apa.org> on behalf of Jed Rose <jed.rose@DUKE.EDU>
Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 1:06 PM
To: DIV28SUPER@lists.apa.org
Subject: Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

I think it is important to distinguish between two quite distinct issues:

1) Acute toxicity of nicotine: it has long been known that nicotine in pure form is highly toxic, and even medicinal nicotine products are not without risk if they fall into the hands of children. It is therefore imperative that the FDA regulate all forms of nicotine to ensure that packaging is acceptably safe;

2) The chronic health risks of moderate doses of nicotine, which are far less than those of cigarettes, according to most experts. These experts include Mitch Zeller, Director of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (he stated the conclusion about nicotine at a recent FDLI conference). Theoretical speculations about nicotinic/muscarinic balance must be viewed in the context of hard evidence, which thus far suggests that nicotine is indeed much less harmful than smoking. See also the findings of the Lung Health Study and other epidemiologic studies of the effects of nicotine when derived from non-combusted tobacco.

Dr. Neal Benowitz, quoted in the New York Time news article, has written:

"The development of a consumer-acceptable inhaled nicotine delivery system with absorption kinetics similar to those of a cigarette would be an important advancement in pursuing harm reduction through nicotine maintenance."
(Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics 83(4):531-41, 2008)

The recent Surgeon General's report estimated 480,000 premature deaths from smoking, largely due to the non-nicotine components of smoke produced by burning tobacco. E-cigarettes represent a promising approach to reducing this enormous death toll, and while FDA regulation is necessary to minimize the risk to children, to label the e-liquid "poison" is a bit of hyperbole that does not contribute to a sensible discussion of the topic.

Sincerely,

Jed E. Rose, Ph.D.
Director, Center for Smoking Cessation
and Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Duke University Medical Center
2424 Erwin Road, Suite 201
Durham, NC 27705
919-668-5055 (phone)
919-668-5088 (FAX)

Dukesmoking.com


-----Original Message-----
From: div28super reaches div28 and div28m and its nested lists (e.g. div28s) [mailto:DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG] On Behalf Of Herbert Barry III PhD
Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 10:38 AM
To: DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG
Subject: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

When I initially heard about e-cigarettes, I doubted that they were safe alternatives to tobacco because of omitting components of tobacco that cause lung cancer and other maladies. Nicotine is a powerful endogenous substance, and overloding the system with exogenous nicotine might have adverse side effects, such as disrupting the balance between nicotinic and muscarinic stimulation.

The new information about toxic and even lethal effects of liquid nicotine indicates a very severe peril. I am reminded now about reports, many years ago, that swallowing a few cigarettes might be lethal because of overdose of nicotine. The effect is greatly diluted when nicotine is in a smoked cigarette.

An analogy is the dangerous and even lethal effects of overdose and chronic ue of morphine, heroin, ad other opiates. An important advance of our knowedge a few decades ago was the discovery of endorphins, which are endogenous sources of analgesia, miimicke by opiates.
--- Herb Barry

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org

Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

These are household products not regulated by FDA (yet); therefore childhood poisoning risks are controlled under this CPSC statute:


Poison Prevention Packaging Act

Enacted in 1970, the PPPA (available in PDF), requires a number of household substances to be packaged in child-resistant packaging. The packaging required by the PPPA must be designed or constructed to be significantly difficult for children under five years of age to open within a reasonable time, and not difficult for normal adults to use properly. For the sake of the elderly and handicapped who might have difficulty opening such containers, the Act provides that a regulated product available for purchase on store shelves may be packaged in one non-complying size provided it carries a warning that it is not recommended for use in households with children, and provided that the product is also supplied in complying popular size packages. Regulated prescription drugs may be dispensed in non-child-resistant packaging upon the specific request of the prescribing doctor or the patient. The Environmental Protection Agency regulates economic poisons, such as pesticides. Since the regulation has been in effect, there have been remarkable declines in reported deaths from ingestions by children of toxic household products including medications.


and


Federal Hazardous Substances Act (FHSA)

The FHSA requires certain hazardous household products to have warning labels. It also gives CPSC the authority to regulate or ban a hazardous substance, and toys or other articles intended for use by children, under certain circumstances to protect the public.  Examples of products regulated under this law include electrically operated toys, cribs, rattles, pacifiers, bicycles, and children’s bunk beds. 


and


Consumer Product Safety Act (CPSA)

Enacted in 1972, CPSA is our umbrella statute. This law established the agency, defines CPSC’s basic authority and authorizes the agency to develop standards and bans. It also gives CPSC the authority to pursue recalls and to ban products under certain circumstances.


http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Regulations-Laws--Standards/Statutes/

#div28

_____________________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org
Div28m members may post here list archive
twitter: @apadiv28 join our network

Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

Yes, the risks of prenatal exposure must be taken into account, but these risks already exist with cigarettes and may also exist with medicinal nicotine products such as gum, patch, etc. The nicotine of e-cigarettes does not pose a novel risk to the fetus in that regard that is not already posed by medicinal nicotine products. And one doesn’t see the pharmaceutical companies’ barrels of nicotine that are used in manufacturing these products as being referred to as “barrels of poison”….

 

 

Jed E. Rose, Ph.D.

Director, Center for Smoking Cessation

and Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Duke University Medical Center

2424 Erwin Road, Suite 201

Durham, NC 27705

919-668-5055 (phone)

919-668-5088 (FAX)

Dukesmoking.com

 

 

From: Weiss, Bernard [mailto:Bernard_Weiss@URMC.Rochester.edu]
Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 1:34 PM
To: Jed Rose; DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG
Subject: Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

 

As  I noted in my previous note, you cannot  so easily dismiss the risks posed by gestational exposure. The scientific literature  contains hundreds of papers attesting to such risks. A developmental neurotoxicant is indeed a poison.

_______________________

 Bernard Weiss, Ph.D.

Professor of Environmental Medicine

University of Rochester

School of Medicine and Dentistry

Rochester, NY 14642

 

tel:         585-275-1736

fax:        585-256-2591

 

 

 

 

From: Jed Rose <jed.rose@DUKE.EDU>
Reply-To: Jed Rose <jed.rose@DUKE.EDU>
Date: Monday, March 24, 2014 1:06 PM
To: "DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG" <DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG>
Subject: Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

 

I think it is important to distinguish between two quite distinct issues:

 

1) Acute toxicity of nicotine: it has long been known that nicotine in pure form is highly toxic, and even medicinal nicotine products are not without risk if they fall into the hands of children. It is therefore imperative that the FDA regulate all forms of nicotine to ensure that packaging is acceptably safe;

 

2) The chronic health risks of moderate doses of nicotine, which are far less than those of cigarettes, according to most experts. These experts include Mitch Zeller, Director of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (he stated the conclusion about nicotine at a recent FDLI conference). Theoretical speculations about nicotinic/muscarinic balance must be viewed in the context of hard evidence, which thus far suggests that nicotine is indeed much less harmful than smoking. See also the findings of the Lung Health Study and other epidemiologic studies of the effects of nicotine when derived from non-combusted tobacco.

 

Dr. Neal Benowitz, quoted in the New York Time news article, has written:

 

"The development of a consumer-acceptable inhaled nicotine delivery system with absorption kinetics similar to those of a cigarette would be an important advancement in pursuing harm reduction through nicotine maintenance."

(Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics 83(4):531-41, 2008)

 

The recent Surgeon General's report estimated 480,000 premature deaths from smoking, largely due to the non-nicotine components of smoke produced by burning tobacco. E-cigarettes represent a promising approach to reducing this enormous death toll, and while FDA regulation is necessary to minimize the risk to children, to label the e-liquid "poison" is a bit of hyperbole that does not contribute to a sensible discussion of the topic.

 

Sincerely,

 

Jed E. Rose, Ph.D.

Director, Center for Smoking Cessation

and Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Duke University Medical Center

2424 Erwin Road, Suite 201

Durham, NC 27705

919-668-5055 (phone)

919-668-5088 (FAX)

 

Dukesmoking.com

 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: div28super reaches div28 and div28m and its nested lists (e.g. div28s) [mailto:DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG] On Behalf Of Herbert Barry III PhD

Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 10:38 AM

Subject: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

 

When I initially heard about e-cigarettes, I doubted that they were safe alternatives to tobacco because of omitting components of tobacco that cause lung cancer and other maladies. Nicotine is a powerful endogenous substance, and overloding the system with exogenous nicotine might have adverse side effects, such as disrupting the balance between nicotinic and muscarinic stimulation.

 

The new information about toxic and even lethal effects of liquid nicotine indicates a very severe peril. I am reminded now about reports, many years ago, that swallowing a few cigarettes might be lethal because of overdose of nicotine. The effect is greatly diluted when nicotine is in a smoked cigarette.

 

An analogy is the dangerous and even lethal effects of overdose and chronic ue of morphine, heroin, ad other opiates. An important advance of our knowedge a few decades ago was the discovery of endorphins, which are endogenous sources of analgesia, miimicke by opiates.

--- Herb Barry

 

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________

 

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________

 

Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

As  I noted in my previous note, you cannot  so easily dismiss the risks posed by gestational exposure. The scientific literature  contains hundreds of papers attesting to such risks. A developmental neurotoxicant is indeed a poison.
_______________________
 Bernard Weiss, Ph.D.
Professor of Environmental Medicine
University of Rochester
School of Medicine and Dentistry
Rochester, NY 14642

tel:         585-275-1736
fax:        585-256-2591




From: Jed Rose <jed.rose@DUKE.EDU>
Reply-To: Jed Rose <jed.rose@DUKE.EDU>
Date: Monday, March 24, 2014 1:06 PM
To: "DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG" <DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG>
Subject: Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

I think it is important to distinguish between two quite distinct issues:

1) Acute toxicity of nicotine: it has long been known that nicotine in pure form is highly toxic, and even medicinal nicotine products are not without risk if they fall into the hands of children. It is therefore imperative that the FDA regulate all forms of nicotine to ensure that packaging is acceptably safe;

2) The chronic health risks of moderate doses of nicotine, which are far less than those of cigarettes, according to most experts. These experts include Mitch Zeller, Director of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (he stated the conclusion about nicotine at a recent FDLI conference). Theoretical speculations about nicotinic/muscarinic balance must be viewed in the context of hard evidence, which thus far suggests that nicotine is indeed much less harmful than smoking. See also the findings of the Lung Health Study and other epidemiologic studies of the effects of nicotine when derived from non-combusted tobacco.

Dr. Neal Benowitz, quoted in the New York Time news article, has written:

"The development of a consumer-acceptable inhaled nicotine delivery system with absorption kinetics similar to those of a cigarette would be an important advancement in pursuing harm reduction through nicotine maintenance."
(Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics 83(4):531-41, 2008)

The recent Surgeon General's report estimated 480,000 premature deaths from smoking, largely due to the non-nicotine components of smoke produced by burning tobacco. E-cigarettes represent a promising approach to reducing this enormous death toll, and while FDA regulation is necessary to minimize the risk to children, to label the e-liquid "poison" is a bit of hyperbole that does not contribute to a sensible discussion of the topic.

Sincerely,

Jed E. Rose, Ph.D.
Director, Center for Smoking Cessation
and Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Duke University Medical Center
2424 Erwin Road, Suite 201
Durham, NC 27705
919-668-5055 (phone)
919-668-5088 (FAX)

Dukesmoking.com


-----Original Message-----
From: div28super reaches div28 and div28m and its nested lists (e.g. div28s) [mailto:DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG] On Behalf Of Herbert Barry III PhD
Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 10:38 AM
Subject: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

When I initially heard about e-cigarettes, I doubted that they were safe alternatives to tobacco because of omitting components of tobacco that cause lung cancer and other maladies. Nicotine is a powerful endogenous substance, and overloding the system with exogenous nicotine might have adverse side effects, such as disrupting the balance between nicotinic and muscarinic stimulation.

The new information about toxic and even lethal effects of liquid nicotine indicates a very severe peril. I am reminded now about reports, many years ago, that swallowing a few cigarettes might be lethal because of overdose of nicotine. The effect is greatly diluted when nicotine is in a smoked cigarette.

An analogy is the dangerous and even lethal effects of overdose and chronic ue of morphine, heroin, ad other opiates. An important advance of our knowedge a few decades ago was the discovery of endorphins, which are endogenous sources of analgesia, miimicke by opiates.
--- Herb Barry

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________

Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

I think it is important to distinguish between two quite distinct issues:

1) Acute toxicity of nicotine: it has long been known that nicotine in pure form is highly toxic, and even medicinal nicotine products are not without risk if they fall into the hands of children. It is therefore imperative that the FDA regulate all forms of nicotine to ensure that packaging is acceptably safe;

2) The chronic health risks of moderate doses of nicotine, which are far less than those of cigarettes, according to most experts. These experts include Mitch Zeller, Director of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (he stated the conclusion about nicotine at a recent FDLI conference). Theoretical speculations about nicotinic/muscarinic balance must be viewed in the context of hard evidence, which thus far suggests that nicotine is indeed much less harmful than smoking. See also the findings of the Lung Health Study and other epidemiologic studies of the effects of nicotine when derived from non-combusted tobacco.

Dr. Neal Benowitz, quoted in the New York Time news article, has written:

"The development of a consumer-acceptable inhaled nicotine delivery system with absorption kinetics similar to those of a cigarette would be an important advancement in pursuing harm reduction through nicotine maintenance."
(Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics 83(4):531-41, 2008)

The recent Surgeon General's report estimated 480,000 premature deaths from smoking, largely due to the non-nicotine components of smoke produced by burning tobacco. E-cigarettes represent a promising approach to reducing this enormous death toll, and while FDA regulation is necessary to minimize the risk to children, to label the e-liquid "poison" is a bit of hyperbole that does not contribute to a sensible discussion of the topic.

Sincerely,

Jed E. Rose, Ph.D.
Director, Center for Smoking Cessation
and Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Duke University Medical Center
2424 Erwin Road, Suite 201
Durham, NC 27705
919-668-5055 (phone)
919-668-5088 (FAX)

Dukesmoking.com


-----Original Message-----
From: div28super reaches div28 and div28m and its nested lists (e.g. div28s) [mailto:DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG] On Behalf Of Herbert Barry III PhD
Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 10:38 AM
To: DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG
Subject: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

When I initially heard about e-cigarettes, I doubted that they were safe alternatives to tobacco because of omitting components of tobacco that cause lung cancer and other maladies. Nicotine is a powerful endogenous substance, and overloding the system with exogenous nicotine might have adverse side effects, such as disrupting the balance between nicotinic and muscarinic stimulation.

The new information about toxic and even lethal effects of liquid nicotine indicates a very severe peril. I am reminded now about reports, many years ago, that swallowing a few cigarettes might be lethal because of overdose of nicotine. The effect is greatly diluted when nicotine is in a smoked cigarette.

An analogy is the dangerous and even lethal effects of overdose and chronic ue of morphine, heroin, ad other opiates. An important advance of our knowedge a few decades ago was the discovery of endorphins, which are endogenous sources of analgesia, miimicke by opiates.
--- Herb Barry

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org

Re: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

Herb,

You are absolutely on target. What concerns me especially is that young women will find these to be attractive alternatives to tobacco, and will be unaware of the potential risks to the fetus once they become pregnant. Marijuana legalization poses the same kind of problems, of course. I wish more public attention were being paid to such risks. It took a long time for us to become sensitive to developmental neurotoxicants.

Bernie
_______________________
 Bernard Weiss, Ph.D.
Professor of Environmental Medicine
University of Rochester
School of Medicine and Dentistry
Rochester, NY 14642

tel:         585-275-1736
fax:        585-256-2591




From: Herbert Barry III PhD <BARRYH@PITT.EDU>
Reply-To: "BARRYH@PITT.EDU" <BARRYH@PITT.EDU>
Date: Monday, March 24, 2014 10:37 AM
To: "DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG" <DIV28SUPER@LISTS.APA.ORG>
Subject: [DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

When I initially heard about e-cigarettes, I doubted that they were safe
alternatives to tobacco because of omitting components of tobacco that
cause lung cancer and other maladies. Nicotine is a powerful endogenous
substance, and overloding the system with exogenous nicotine might have
adverse side effects, such as disrupting the balance between nicotinic and
muscarinic stimulation.

The new information about toxic and even lethal effects of liquid nicotine
indicates a very severe peril. I am reminded now about reports, many years
ago, that swallowing a few cigarettes might be lethal because of overdose
of nicotine. The effect is greatly diluted when nicotine is in a smoked
cigarette.

An analogy is the dangerous and even lethal effects of overdose and
chronic ue of morphine, heroin, ad other opiates. An important advance of
our knowedge a few decades ago was the discovery of endorphins, which are
endogenous sources of analgesia, miimicke by opiates.
--- Herb Barry

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________

[DIV28SUPER] peril of e-cigarettes

When I initially heard about e-cigarettes, I doubted that they were safe
alternatives to tobacco because of omitting components of tobacco that
cause lung cancer and other maladies. Nicotine is a powerful endogenous
substance, and overloding the system with exogenous nicotine might have
adverse side effects, such as disrupting the balance between nicotinic and
muscarinic stimulation.

The new information about toxic and even lethal effects of liquid nicotine
indicates a very severe peril. I am reminded now about reports, many years
ago, that swallowing a few cigarettes might be lethal because of overdose
of nicotine. The effect is greatly diluted when nicotine is in a smoked
cigarette.

An analogy is the dangerous and even lethal effects of overdose and
chronic ue of morphine, heroin, ad other opiates. An important advance of
our knowedge a few decades ago was the discovery of endorphins, which are
endogenous sources of analgesia, miimicke by opiates.
--- Herb Barry

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org

[DIV28SUPER] NYTimes: Selling a Poison by the Barrel: Liquid Nicotine for E-Cigarettes

http://nyti.ms/OPTavk

"E-liquids" used to refill e-cigarettes are potent, unregulated neurotoxins. Evidence of the potential dangers is already emerging.

#div28
___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org

2014-03-20

[DIV28M] Highlighting PsycCRITIQUES blog posting "Don=?Windows-1252?Q?=92t?= Worry, Be Happy, Try These Pills"

This notice has been sent on behalf of Danny Wedding, editor of APA's online book and film review journal PsycCRITIQUES. APA developed a PsycCRITIQUES blog that makes it possible for interested psychologists around the world to read selected book and film reviews and comment on the issues raised in those reviews.  We think this week's blog posting, entitled "Don't Worry, Be Happy, Try These Pills" about the book "Happy-People-Pills for All" would interest members of Division 28.

 

For the coming week, this blog posting is on the home page at http://psyccritiquesblog.apa.org/ (afterwards, it will be found in our Recent Posts list or our Archives).

At this site you can review the blog and make comments (click on the red comments button at the bottom of the probe).

We would welcome your comments to this blog posting, or any previous postings you may find of interest in our archives. You can also subscribe to all new blog posts via email and web-based news readers at http://feeds2.feedburner.com/PsycCRITIQUESBlog .

 

Regards,

Christine Pearce

Managing Editor, PsycCRITIQUES

Reviewer Guidelines and Forms available at

http://www.apa.org/pubs/databases/psyccritiques/reviewer-guidelines.aspx

 

Editorial Office mailing address:

Christoph Zepeda, Editorial Assistant, PsycCRITIQUES

California School of Professional Psychology

Alliant International University

One Beach St., Suite 200

San Francisco, CA 94133-1221

Fax: 314-754-9913

Editorial office phone: (415) 955-2177

Phone for C. Pearce in Oregon: (541) 246-8690

Journal Email: cpearce@alliant.edu (if difficulty with this email, try psyccritiques@gmail.com)

 

Visit the PsycCRITIQUES Blog: http://psyccritiquesblog.apa.org/

and comment on or read featured reviews

 

2014-03-18

[DIV28SUPER] FW: Postdoctoral opportunity for trainees

A postdoctoral training position is available in the Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders
(http://www.scripps.edu/research/cnad/) at The Scripps Research Institute (www.scripps.edu). The trainee will benefit from a vibrant research environment in CNAD which houses the laboratories of multiple investigators focused on topics related to substance abuse. The Taffe laboratory will serve as the primary training environment but collaborative work with one or more of our ongoing collaborators is expected. Current projects in the laboratory focus on the reinforcing, addictive and toxic effects of psychomotor stimulants, including novel cathinone derivatives, of the exogenous cannabinoids/cannabimimetics and of prescription opioids in rodent models. In addition to basic behavioral and neurobiological consequences, the group investigates the potential of anti-drug vaccination and/or physical exercise to moderate drug effects.

Applicants should have a recent doctoral degree in neuroscience, behavioral pharmacology, experimental psychology or related field and a strong interest in substance abuse research. An ability to think critically and creatively, along with strong writing and communication skills is essential. Previous experience with /in vivo/ rodent models is preferred, but not essential. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. /The Scripps Research Institute is an equal opportunity employer and individuals underrepresented in the field are especially encouraged to apply./

Please send a cover letter, CV and contact information for three references to Dr. Taffe (mtaffe@scripps.edu).

--
Michael A. Taffe, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders Mailcode SP30-2400 The Scripps Research Institute
10550 North Torrey Pines Road
La Jolla CA 92037
ph. 858.784.7228; fax: 858.784.7405
http://www.scripps.edu/cnad/taffe/

___________________ div28SUPER@lists.apa.org _____________________
Div28m members may post here subscribers corner: http://lists.apa.org

2014-03-17

[DIV28SUPER] Summer Institute on Innovative Methods

Announcing the 2014 Methodology Center Summer Institute on Innovative Methods:
 
Experimental Design and Analysis Methods for Developing Adaptive Interventions: Getting SMART
 
We are pleased to announce that Drs. Daniel Almirall and Inbal "Billie" Nahum-Shani, Methodology Center researchers at the University of Michigan, will be teaching this year's Summer Institute on Innovative Methods, "Experimental Design and Analysis Methods for Developing Adaptive Interventions: Getting SMART."  Sponsored by Penn State'sMethodology Center and the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the 19th Summer Institute will introduce adaptive interventions; provide the background needed to plan a sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trial (SMART); and present the data analysis methods needed to construct adaptive interventions using SMART study data.

The institute will be held June 19-20, 2014, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  Please visithttp://methodology.psu.edu/summerinstitute/ to learn more and submit your application. The deadline for applications isMarch 31.

 

Background
 
The management of many health disorders often entails a sequential, individualized approach whereby treatment is adapted and re-adapted over time in response to the specific needs and evolving status of the individual. Adaptive interventions provide one way to operationalize the strategies (e.g., continue, augment, switch, step-down) leading to individualized sequences of treatment. An adaptive intervention is a sequence of decision rules that specify whether, how or when (timing) to individualize treatment in the course of an individual's care. Often, a wide variety of critical questions must be answered when developing a high-quality adaptive intervention. Yet, there is often insufficient empirical evidence or theoretical basis to address these questions. The sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trial (SMART)—a type of research design—was developed explicitly for the purpose of building high-quality adaptive interventions. SMART designs represent an attractive alternative to the standard randomized clinical trial when the overarching aim is to construct (as opposed to evaluate) a high-quality adaptive intervention.

Sample of Topics to be Covered
  • When and why adaptive interventions are needed
  • The critical components of adaptive interventions: decision points, tailoring variables, intervention options and decision rules
  • SMART study principles, including how to provide a rationale for designing a SMART
  • Data analytic strategies used to examine primary and secondary scientific aims in a SMART
In addition to the above topics, several hands-on computer exercises will be woven throughout the lecture, and time will be reserved for question/answer periods and open discussion.  

 

Learn More

 

http://methodology.psu.edu/summerinstitute/


Katie Bode-Lang, Assistant Director
The Methodology Center · Penn State University
400 Calder Square II · University Park, PA 16802
Phone: 814.867.0333 · kbodelang@psu.edu
Web: http://methodology.psu.edu